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Local and beyond gardening comments, info
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by Karen L Fleisher
on August 11, 2014 at 9:43 AM
I have a Jujube tree which I planted about a year and a half ago also. It is bearing fruit for the first time - about a dozen. I water it infrequently, about twice a month. I have never fertilized it. I first heard of jujubes at the Farmers Market at Sears where one of the vendors sells dried jujubes which I love. So, I planted my own! There is a mature jujube tree on the corner of Bandini and Osbourn here in Riverside (in the front yard).
by Marco Baldi
on August 13, 2014 at 5:19 PM
We have a tree at Grow Lab, it is in its second bearing season and is loaded with fruit right now... some are ready to pick. The tree is semi-trained as a espalier and will probably get a bit more formal pruning this fall. Last year I eat some fruit fresh off the tree and used some cubed in salads in place of dates. Anyone who wants to see the tree may come for a visit on any given Saturday.
by Marco Baldi
on August 13, 2014 at 5:21 PM
We have a jujube tree at Grow Lab, it is in its second bearing season and is loaded with fruit right now... some are ready to pick. The tree is semi-trained as a espalier and will probably get a bit more formal pruning this fall. Last year I ate some fruit fresh off the tree and used some cubed in salads in place of dates. Anyone who wants to see the tree may come for a visit on any given Saturday.
by Jenifer Aragon
on August 14, 2014 at 10:51 PM
I have two Jujube trees planted together. They are always happy; however,if you don't give them enough water their fruit will be dry (for lack of a better term) I have a Sugar Cane and a Lang. I got them at Parkview. They have tons of fruit. I let them dry on the tree. They'll turn reddish-brown and wrinkle up and then you can dry them more and use them like dates. They don't put out suckers unless the ground is quite moist. Easy to prune. Nice blog Janet!
by Lisa Lemoine
on August 31, 2014 at 8:33 PM
I'd like to thank those who shared information on the jujube tree. My aunt, who is from the Mediterranean--now 86, fondly remembers this fruit as a favorite and my husband remembers climbing into his Grandmother's jujube in south Louisiana. I look forward to growing our own now having heard your experiences.
by Larry Dodson
on September 3, 2014 at 8:39 PM
Many members of the Inland Empire chapter of the California Rare Fruit Growers have jujube trees in our gardens. There are several named cultivars - some better than others. At the November meeting if IE CRFG, the program will feature a talk by Roger Meyer, and expert on jujubes and owner of a commercial jujube operation. It is considered a sacred tree and is used in Islamic cleansing rituals. I have an abundant crop on my tree this year that I can share. The fruit is also known as Chinese dates, and the fried fruit tastes somewhat like dates. Jujube trees are easily stated from the suckers that sprout. They bare fruit usually within a year of planting.
by Larry Dodson
on September 3, 2014 at 8:49 PM
My fingers are not a nimble as they used to be. I meant to say "dried" jujube fruits (not "fried") taste somewhat like dates.
by Debbra Corbin-Euston
on September 8, 2014 at 9:39 AM
Thank you for this article. It was very informative and we may just add a Jujube tree to the list of trees and plants that will be going into the front yard as we make it a more water conscious yard since it needs little water. Great and informative article. :-)
by Pauline J Pedigo
on September 12, 2014 at 7:34 AM
Our Jujube tree in the Gro-Lab also has spikes around the fruit that will catch you off-guard if you do not know this about the tree. So I would suggest that you wear gloves when picking the dates. Also, wipe off or wash before eating if the fruit has become dusty. As the yellow fruit turns brown and then wrinkles the taste becomes sweeter. They are beautiful and large hanging on the espaliered tree we have and very tasty. It's nice to have fruit you can pick and eat while you're gardening. I used to have a Jujube tree many years ago but took them out because they had small fruit with spikes and produced too many suckers. Unfortunatly, the metal label only says "Chinese Jujube". I plan to plant some of the seeds I've been saving and also check with Rare Fruit Growers and Parkview Nursery for the varieties available. Thanks Janet for a really nice article.
by Larry Dodson
on September 12, 2014 at 1:24 PM
Last evening at the California Rare Fruit Grower's meeting, on the tasting table there were fresh Lang jujubes, and a delectable jujube tea and jujube bread made with dried fruit with no sugar added. My mature Lang tree is nearly thornless. Fruit of the Lang tree is quite tasty when fully mature and can be left on the tree to dry. Young suckers from which new trees are usually propagated tend to have more thorns, but for the most part, they disappear as the Lang tree matures. The amount of thorns varies depending on the cultivar. New trees from suckers will produce fruit within a year or two at the most. A large percentage of jujube seeds are not viable, and fruit from seedlings often are nothing like that from the parent tree. Seedling also take much longer to fruit. Because of this, most jujubes are propagated by suckers or grafted onto rootstock. CRFG will have Lang suckers available, and on request, members can have scion wood from various cultivars available at the annual scion exchange that will take place on January 8, 2015. That meeting will feature grafting demonstrations.
 
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